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  • Don’t ignore dry rot

    Don’t ignore dry rot

    Dry rot is a wood destroying fungus that can cause huge damage to buildings if it is not treated effectively. The issue will initially attack timbers that have a high moisture content and aren’t given time to fully dry out. Once this happens the rot can spread to other building materials, weakening and destroying them...
  • Professional assistance for plumbing emergencies

    Professional assistance for plumbing emergencies

    There is nothing more stressful than facing some kind of plumbing nightmare in your home. There are many things that can go wrong in houses if there are issues that have been left untreated or if systems have not been maintained by previous occupants. Blocked drains and sinks and problems with boilers and heating systems...
  • Hidden dangers in historic damp proofing

    Hidden dangers in historic damp proofing

    There are a number of buildings across Teesside which appear to have very effective damp proofing in place. In many cases, it will have been installed many years ago, and the property owners will tell you that they’ve never had a problem with it. However, we would always urge those with longstanding damp proofing measures...
  • Reducing the risk of winter damp

    Reducing the risk of winter damp

    Properties in the UK are exposed to the most adverse weather in winter, having to deal with rain, snow, ice, low temperatures and even high winds. If you don’t make sure your property is winter-proof you could find yourself with large bills to repair issues. It is better to be proactive and invest in prevention...
  • When damp problems come from within

    When damp problems come from within

    When your property has a problem with damp, the first instinct is to assume that the rain is the source of water that’s causing the damage. This is certainly true in a majority of cases, but it is not the only possible cause. In many cases, damp problems are caused by water inside the property...
  • Avoiding the aesthetic and structural damage of damp

    Avoiding the aesthetic and structural damage of damp

    The presence of rising damp is often misdiagnosed in properties. The term refers to the upwards movement of moisture through structural materials and finishes. It is often found in the parts of a building that are occupied the most. The moisture dissolves soluble salts from the materials such as calcium sulphate and it can also...
  • Potential causes of damp

    Potential causes of damp

    Properties can suffer with damp for several different reasons, including the lack of a damp proof course leaving your property prone to moisture rising from the ground or a poorly fitted window frame allowing moisture to gain entry. In order to treat issues, it is important to know what is causing them. Here are a...
  • How damp affects coastal buildings

    How damp affects coastal buildings

    While damp is a problem which can affect properties across the UK, it tends to be more frequent and troublesome in buildings at coastal locations as opposed to those further inland. Soil salinity levels play a significant part in how likely it is that damp will affect a structure, as well as how serious the...
  • Two problems with solid-wall properties

    Two problems with solid-wall properties

    Solid-walled houses were built in the UK until the 1930s before being replaced by cavity-walled properties. These had thicker walls because they were made in two layers with a small cavity left between them. The idea is that this cuts heat loss because the gap can be filled with air or insulating materials, thereby reducing...
  • Peerless plastering for domestic properties

    Peerless plastering for domestic properties

    Plastering is often considered an art form. The process can dramatically alter the appearance of interior walls and restore damaged surfaces, getting rid of irregularities such as bumps and dents and protruding nails and screws. The hardness of plaster offers strength and durability. Additionally, the final result is a flat surface that can be evenly...